Wednesday, May 13, 2015

What I've learned from...my dogs


When you see the chicken, you eat the chicken. 

Sitting still is hard to do when you are excited. Embrace the wiggle.

Nap often. 

Hugs are necessary when you haven't seen someone for a long time. A long time can be defined as anything over 2 hours. 

Magic is way more fun if you play along. If the ball looks gone then the ball really is gone. Don't spend too much time worrying about the logic behind it all.

Sometimes complaining enough can get you exactly what you want from someone else. If they really love you they'll forgive you.

Flies are the spawn of the devil.

Mistakes happen. Move forward. Don't keep blaming yourself when everyone else around you has already forgiven. 

Looking guilty can seriously deplete anger. 

Love. With everything. Don't hold back. 



Monday, May 11, 2015

Finding the Color in The Book Thief


Title: The Book Thief

Author: Markus Zusak

Six word summary: Death meets girl, girl meets death.

If you love historical fiction about World War II you'll love this book.

If you dislike unusual narration styles you might want to steer clear (although really you shouldn't because this book is amazing).

A favorite quote:
"Steadily, the room shrank, till the book thief could touch the shelves within a few small steps. She ran the back of her hand along the first shelf, listening to the shuffle of her fingernails gliding across the spinal cord of each book. It sounded like an instrument, or the notes of running feet. She used both hands. She raced them. One shelf against the other. And she laughed. Her voice was sprawled out, high in her throat, and when she eventually stopped and stood in the middle of the room, she spent many minutes looking from the shelves to her fingers and back again."

Review:

As the title of my new series was inspired by this book I felt it was absolutely necessary to start here. I first met Liesel Meminger when my roommate from college, another avid reader, thrust her worn copy of The Book Thief into my hands and exclaimed "You have to read this."

The second time I met Liesel was in an academic course. Our professor asked us to read The Book Thief as a way to access how powerful literacy can be in a life. For Liesel, words become everything.

I was swept away by Zusak's artful storytelling surrounding the young protagonist and her experiences living in Germany during World War II. Liesel is sent to live with the Hubermann's, a poor family living in rural Germany, by her mother in the beginnings of the war. However, Zusak has written her story with a twist. Death is the narrator. Death meets Liesel, the book thief, three times. Each marks another death surrounding Liesel's life.

Death is able to tell Liesel's story when she, in her grief, drops a handwritten life story and he scoops it up. The book tells of her life, her friend Rudy, and the mysterious Jewish man the Hubermann's take in, Max. Books become her source of power, legitimacy, and connection and it is through books she is able to communicate, respond, and grow.

A powerful read and artfully crafted, Zusak has created a story which not only reveals the horrors of life in Germany during World War II, but also the connection which can be formed through words and community. Well worth the read.



Friday, May 1, 2015

Memory 23




Of all the fictional men I've loved, Gilbert Blythe will always be the first and longest running.


For those of you that weren't homeschooled in the 1980s and 90s Gilbert Blythe was Anne Shirley's best chum in the 1980s Canadian adaptation of L.M Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables series.

I cannot tell you how many sleep overs were had to binge watch both Anne of Green Gables and Anne of Green Gables: The Sequel. With a combined running time of just over 7 hours these movies made the perfect marathon sleep over movie (along with the BBC Pride and Prejudice, a running time just under 6 hours, with Colin Firth as Mr. Darcy...swoon) 

I was not prepared to be so heartbroken when I heard the news of Jonathan Crombie's death. And yet it really did feel as if an old friend had passed. I immedietly dug up copies and recreated my old binge watching. 

One article, "Why We Loved Gilbert Blythe" by Sarah Larson perfectly describes my ache. She says, "The “Anne” series let us dream about adolescence while holding on to childhood. The world of Avonlea—Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert, the apple blossoms and the knickers and caps, dance cards, hay rides, Gilbert’s patient and steadfast heart—was gentler than what we might have imagined about adolescence. It wasn’t “The Breakfast Club,” and that was, on some secret level, very exciting—a last moment of being able to enjoy gentler childhood ideals. “Anne of Green Gables” appealed to those impulses without condescending to us. It wasn’t exactly cool. It had no edge. You didn’t want to race into school and announce that you were obsessed with “Anne of Green Gables.” But, to your bosom friend, you could discuss its many joys to your heart’s content."

What is one movie from your childhood you still watch today?

Thursday, April 30, 2015

Let me reintroduce myself...

When I started this blog in 2009 I never imagined it would last. However, I eventually found the value in having a little corner of my life dedicated to making mistakes, writing about weird things, and taking pictures. A place I could come at 2 AM with coffee and an idea and make things happen.

I've been reading the book Girl Zines: Making Media Doing Feminism by Alison Piepmeier for a master's course. She talks through the Girls Zines which were made in the 1990s by young feminists looking for a way to express themselves. As I read through I was struck by what these zines did for young women. In short, Piepmeier argues zines "are sites where girls and women construct identities."

Ok, I get it, I get it. Blogging is different. And I know that. But it made me nostalgic. For the moment when blogging was that for me. It was my community and my way to think and take care of myself.

So I wanna try this again. With a face lift. I said earlier I don't know how to blog now that I'm different. But instead of giving up I'm just gunna wing it and try.

I thought it might help to reintroduce myself. So....

Name: Hannah Elizabeth Cole

Age: 26

Career: I'm a student and GTA at the University of Missouri - Kansas City. I graduate in August

Favorite book: Peter Pan

One thing I've learned today is Hobby Lobby closes at 8 pm

One thing that makes me happy is my coffee mug collection

One thing that makes me sad is breaking a coffee mug

I've tried sushi once and threw up afterwards. My best friends still make fun of me for it

The most important thing for you to know about me today is I am terrified of taking a course on Ulysses this summer


Thursday, January 16, 2014

Thoughts from an Extrovert

I refuse to only blog about being married. I refuse

But I have to say, being married has taught me some really interesting things. Or maybe it's just been the past year and a half that have taught me a lot of interesting things and I've just happened to be married in that time. 

I am an extrovert. I knew this. But I never realized how much. 

Example, I was home all day yesterday by myself and the day before. When Isaac came home I was a hot mess. Seriously. I am never spending that much time alone again. 

I've always thought I liked being alone. But it turns out I like hanging out with myself...if that makes any sort of sense at all. I'm still interacting with a person. Journaling. Writing music. Dreaming about my future kitchen. 

I sound like Rachel from Friends when she was dating herself. But I digress.

I need to learn to follow recipes. 

Before the last year and a half I thought I was an amazing cook. Turns out scrambling eggs and cooking Kraft Mac N' Cheese doesn't count. 

I love beautiful quotes about simple things. 
"I do believe in an everyday sort of magic - the inexplicable connectedness we sometimes experience with places, people, works of art and the like; the eerie appropriateness of moments of synchronicity; the whispered voice, the hidden presence, when we think we’re alone.” - Charles de Lint
via  
Currently Obsessed